My Influences:

My Father

Stephen Daldry: He is an English director and producer of film, theatre, and television. He has won three Olivier Awards for his work in the West End and two Tony Awards for his work on Broadway. He has received three Academy Awards nominations for Best Director, for films Billy Elliot (2000), The Hours (2002), and The Reader (2008). (CAME TO NYCCT.) He came and spoke to my tech production class.

 

Philo Taylor Farnsworth (August 19, 1906 – March 11, 1971) was an American inventor and television pioneer.[2][3] He made many crucial contributions to the early development of all-electronic television.[4] He is best known for his 1927 invention of the first fully functional all-electronic image pickup device (video camera tube), the image dissector, as well as the first fully functional and complete all-electronic television system.[5][6] Farnsworth developed a television system complete with receiver and camera—which he produced commercially through the Farnsworth Television and Radio Corporation from 1938 to 1951, in Fort Wayne, Indiana.[7][8

The show starred Lucille Ball, her then real-life husband Desi ArnazVivian Vance, and William Frawley. It followed the life of Lucy Ricardo (Ball), a young middle-class housewife in New York City, who either concocted plans with her best friends Ethel and Fred Mertz (Vance and Frawley) to appear alongside her bandleader husband Ricky Ricardo (Arnaz) in his nightclub, or tried numerous schemes to mingle with, or be a part of show business.

At a press conference on this day in 1954, President Dwight D. Eisenhower said the collapse of French rule in Vietnam under pressure from a communist-led insurgency could precipitate a “domino”-like impact in Southeast Asia. This so-called domino theory dominated much of American policy toward Vietnam for the ensuing decade.

On Sunday, Feb. 9, 1964, over 73 million Americans gathered around television sets to see what all the excitement was about. For several weeks American radio stations had been saturating the airwaves with Beatles music. The power of radio had led to sales of millions of Beatles singles and albums. For weeks, the country had been warned “The Beatles Are Coming!” The American press picked up on the story, with several magazines and newspapers running feature stories on the group. Two days earlier, CBS and ABC showed film of The Beatles’ arrival in America at New York’s Kennedy Airport on their evening news shows. But the big event was The Beatles’ first live appearance on American television, which took place on the country’s most popular variety program, “The Ed Sullivan Show”.

Apollo 11 was the spaceflight that first landed humans on the Moon. Commander Neil Armstrong and lunar module pilot Buzz Aldrin formed the American crew that landed the Apollo Lunar Module Eagle on July 20, 1969, at 20:17 UTC. Armstrong became the first person to step onto the lunar surface six hours and 39 minutes later on July 21 at 02:56 UTC; Aldrin joined him 19 minutes later. They spent about two and a quarter hours together outside the spacecraft. The mission was extensively covered in the press. OVER 53 MILLION HOUSEHOLDS tuned in to watch this mission on TV, and an estimated 650 million viewers worldwide watched the Moon landing.[1]This broke the previous record of the most viewers, and launched the Apollo 11 coverage to be the most watched TV programming up to that date.

ESPN Monday Night Football (abbreviated as MNF and also known as ESPN Monday Night Football on ABC for rare live special broadcast) is a live television broadcast of weekly National Football League (NFL) games on ESPN in the United States. From 1970 to 2005, it aired on sister broadcast network ABC. Monday Night Football was, along with Hallmark Hall of Fame and the Walt Disney anthology television series, one of the longest-running prime time programs ever on commercial network television, and one of the highest-rated, particularly among male viewers. MNF is preceded on air by Monday Night Countdown.

The heir to the British throne, Prince Charles, and Lady Diana Spencer were wed on July 29, 1981 at St. Paul’s Cathedral in London. Frequently called “the wedding of the century,” the glamorous ceremony was attended by 3,500 guests and watched on television by 750 million people

comedian Ellen DeGeneres, a neurotic bookstore owner in her thirties. The title of the series was These Friends of Mine for the first season, but it was subsequently changed to avoid confusion with the NBC series Friends, which premiered in September 1994.

The series centered on Ellen’s dealing with her quirky friends, her family, and the problems of daily life, set in Los Angeles. The series is notable for being one of the first in the US with a main character to come out as gay, which DeGeneres’ character did in the 1997 episode “The Puppy Episode“, which aired shortly after DeGeneres publicly revealed that she was gay in real life. This event received a great deal of media exposure, ignited controversy, and prompted ABC to place a parental advisory at the beginning of each episode.

The first inauguration of Barack Obama as the 44th President of the United States took place on Tuesday, January 20, 2009, at the West Front of the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C. The 56th inauguration, which set a record attendance for any event held in Washington, D.C., marked the commencement of the first term of Barack Obama as President and Future President Joe Biden as Vice President.[1] Based on combined attendance numbers, television viewership, and Internet traffic, it was one of the most-observed events ever by the global audience. (F

14 + 10 =

css.php